Tibetan Cedar Annual Rings Told Scientists about Climate Change

03.08.2017

Russian climatologists, with the support of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have examined several hundred cedars that grew in 20 corners of Tibet in the last 55 years. As a result, a virtual analogue of the Tibetan forest was created, which shows that since 1982, trees began to grow 6 days earlier and grew 10 days longer than in the past. This means that even then the global warming began to appear in the region.

Tibetan Cedar Annual Rings Told Scientists about Climate Change

It turns out that such a method of assessing the climate effect on ecosystems is more effective than satellite observations. Rings of trees that have been growing for several centuries in one place can tell about changes in air temperature, precipitation and even about cosmic cataclysms. Depending on the conditions, the layer of wood has a different shape and thickness.

In mountainous and circumpolar regions, the increase in temperature is particularly strong, so it is so important to study the impact of global warming on Tibet and similar places.